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have a predictable regulatory environment. we do a good job of educating the kids. we have a good tax break. we're doing all the things -- >> it sounds like you're agreeing with the pope then? >> you look at the result, we have less disparity in the income that can most any other state. we would love to have the pope. he can come to provo anytime. >> you have a deep and personal passion about helping the poor, and i suspect you resonated deeply with pope francis ooze comments which were very powerful and compelling in many ways, but i'm puzzled. wise in the last 30 years we've had dramatic economic growth. i was very fortunate i was there with reagan and with clinton. in the case of the clinton administration when we worked with them, from 1993 to 200, one of the very four people of poverty left poverty, and huge economic growth. about 3 1/2, 4 million people, xw a million and a half people, lost their jobs. why is it so hard to look at the things that have work. try to find a way and say, which of these pieces really worked. find out what are their patterns? and how can we replicate
children are precious commodity in the hope is we will do some things to help them with their education. the senior citizens, persons who are not able to take care of themselves to the extent you and i can take care of ourselves, i would like it if you'd comment on efforts made to help them comment on the efforts to help reestablish schools as quickly as possible. she indicated the number one concern to shelter. this was the case of coors in louisiana after katrina, shelter is a great importance. as well as in sri lanka. i know we have a lot of experience dealing the shelter after these tragic events. i also know what is true about them being in harms way to this very day because the hurricane season -- well, the typhoon season for them, which is the zenith at apex of the month of december. so there may be something else living on the right. their number one need to shelter. if you'd comment on the shelter issue. one additional comment and complement with reference to the ability to move 800,000 people, that is remarkable. it is no small feat in to do this at the limited amount of time
that poverty because she lumberjacks a decent education or a health care or a community that views her future as their own it should offend all of us. the combined trends of declining mobility it poses a threat to our way of life. what drives me as a zbroond, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the current minimum wage is $7.25, adjusted for inflation. that's more than $3 less than the minimum wage was back in 1968. president obama said he'll support a senate bill to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 but not going to be easy. >> what would the prospects of that be not only in the senate but the house? >> they are not good. it would be easier to do that than to increase taxes on the wealthy at this point in time because that's been ruled off the table by congressional republicans. if you're going after inequality with those brunt instrument, minimum wage would be easier to do. income in equality, the historical trends are staggering. with respect to fast food wo
there. he'll be talking about education policy. [inaudible conversations] >> hey, good afternoon, everyone. we're going to go ahead and get started. hey, how you doing this afternoon? i'm rick hess, director of education policy studies here at the american enterprise institute. happy to welcome all of you to join us today for this promising and, i think, intriguing conversation with connecticut governor dan malloy. delighted to have those of you who are here with us and also those of you watching at home either via live stream or on c-span2. the hashtag for the event is hashtag ct ed reform, that's capital ct ed reform. feel free to follow along or join in. we are going to be going for an hour, until 2:30. format's going to be pretty straightforward. first, governor malloy, dan malloy of connecticut, has been kind enough to agree to share some thoughts on the dos and don'ts of school reform in connecticut, what are some of the lessons they've learned as they have tackled this work. i'm going to then have an opportunity to chat with the governor for 15 or 20 minutes, ask him a cou
. they will pour resources into helping to improve the education of every child growing up in their native land. mandela greatly valued education. he once said education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. >> education was just very, very important to my grandfather. education is one of his things that he's so passionate about. every single one our family was educated. because he said when you're educated nobody else can take it away from you. >> for their support, for their love, for their dedication towards my father and the family. to thank them for their prayers and comfort during this difficult time. >> our thanks to the mandela family for sharing their father with the world. in the words of else in mandela, for to be free is not nearly to cast off ones chains but to live in a way that enhances the freedom of others. his daughter says he achieved that through the practice of peace and reconciliation. >> thank you, kelly. there are some new concerns over so-called energy drinks. accord to a brand-new study, those beverages can pose a serious risk to your heart
forces last month. bernard smith has more from cairo. >> former center of islamic education in egypt has been one of the focal points for people, students protesting the coup that deposed mohamed morsi back in september. there's fighting still ongoing despite the arrests, between students and security forces all day. in fact it seems to have stepped up over the past few days, protests pretty much all the time but yesterday we had a group of women students just outside the university beaten up by local residents and by security forces, we are told. earlier last month we had 21 students facing trial for previous protests at al assad university and we have another 12 students who have been jailed for 17 years for protesting again at that same university. so a considerable crack down by the security forces against the students and at al assad university and they are continuing to protest and they seem to be gathering in intensity. >> thailand will hold its parliamentary plekses o election january 2nd, after yin luck shinawatra has, run the country. wayne hay reports from bangkok. >> the lead
to take a part that have memorial. of course, mandela believed education was the foundation for a new south africa. but 37 years protesting in soweto, apartheid is proving hard to overcome. [ cheering ] >> nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an anti-apartheid activist, he placed education is the the center of the struggle. his single priority was develop the nation's education. in 197, the soweto up rising began over being forced to learn afrikaans, the language of the oppressors. noone of the students who rioted now is principal of the school. >> wlater because of they were trying to educate us and we begin to understand why the situation, why the up rising. >> reporter: here the students learn as nelson mandela, to educate black students to the level of their white counter parts, to give them purpose. >> they have struggled to fulfill mandela's vision. schools outside cape town are more typical of the problems that the system is struggling with. activists argue there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and
, prosperous, and out of jail is education. it is a tricky business. what we have is not working. it may not be a magic list that will make our schools the best, but what we can do and what we need to do is expand the options, more choices for people, have to be better. the best way to provide education is through competition and school choice, just vouchers, charter schools. we need and all the above strategy, less mandates from washington, more local control. we need to give people flexibility when it comes to where they send their kids to school. a pastor says school choice is a civil rights issue. he might be right. we are part of the country that tries school choice as benefits, especially minorities. too much the government says here is a school in your district, it is failing, tough luck. people in detroit have had enough of this. 80% percent of the parents in detroit would have enough choice would take another choice. families want the freedom to choose to send their kids were they would like to send them. i want them to have as many choices as possible. i live where public schoo
held at night, they were trying to educate us to begin to understand why the boycott, why the situation, why the uprising. >> he understood as nelson mandela did the urgent need to educate black students to the standards of their white counterparts to give them both purpose and hope. >> the truth is the anc is la really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela's idealistic vision, school buildings are falling apart and crowding is rife. schools ton bleak cape flat south side cape town is more symbolistic of the system struggling with. activists argued there is a dangerous gap between promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate. but to graduate students only need 30% on their exams. a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> and the end of the study about 50% of those young people have fallen out of the system. so it also has to do with the curriculum, it has -- also has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had during end today. >> so schools are still struggling with the legacy of apartheid, its burden stubbornly persistent
and height as me being me and i had a nice business education and health facilities across the country but it doesn't keep the book is entitled to overtime and fifty injected into the gates so its activities by supporters of bnp. gemma activist groups and intrusive who looks like the guy cheated on. considering it. i need to. the temple. but inside hot sexy got to know he showed and headed out i'm sure there'd be notch would like these. so distance to the conviction commission offices in boulder damaging financial documents important piece of it toward a peace talks. opposition activists also damaging the charts but the nice treatment systems in diamond idea and women seek weeks disrupted train services on set of hoops but toward the goal. good enough to let the buddha said the staff of the way i've been colossal of august the muffled in the moment we receive a book of noah quartz security has been stepped up in the capital to complete the second adam and itchy border guards of skin folds from evoke doc its fullest cars buses and trucks just opened on the main roads what about al qaeda
educate. he was the most educated candidate they ever had to try to move voters to a new place. >> you mentioned the learning. and gay mcdougall, you campaigned to release him from prison. he used the time in prison to be educated as well. >> absolutely. he used it to be educated and educated the other prisoners. he called it the university of robben island. they spent time learning about political development around the world. they decided who they, as a political party and as, you know, activists, wanted to be. the decisionmaking. when they finally emerged, from that prison, they knew exactly the road they wanted to travel. >> and jendayi frazer, he was conscious of his role as educator when he became president and after he left office as well. didn't often hide disappointment in what was going on in south africa and other african nations. >> yes, he certainly was. i think president mandela, what i took from him was the courage of his convictions. he was very clear when he did not agree. he would do that privately and publicly. for instance, on the issue of hiv and aids, he certainly
that is done here. and all the non-profits that call the arc home offer access to everything from education to health care to the safe shelter from the streets. which means you're harnessing the power of community. to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your reflects the tradition that run through our history. the blood vessel we're greater together than on our own. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some contentious debates. i think it's fair to say. and between a reckless shut down by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admitly poor execution on my administration's part on implementing the latest stage of the new law. it's not surprising the frustrations with the are at the all-time high. we know the frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles fop make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hay work, the deck stacked against them. it's rooted in the fear they kids w
back to your basic things, individual's abilities to aspire to their fullest potential. education is a major part of it. th is not obviously available to the extent it should be to help people overme the other limitationons. there are so many stctural problems that have to be addressed. we do not even get close to that with this spee. >> charles, according to a polling,g, most americans beliee the rich are geing cher, the poor arere getting poorer. 92% of democrats believe that. 50% of americans. it does s not help the republicans' image. talking about tting food stamps. >> i think the polls are right and obama has been over that gap. the memedian house hold come was $56,000. is $5252,500. there has been a drop in median income. while the rich have watched their stocks double since the day obama came into offe. on the one hand he has a fed pumping up, inflating the pricinof housing and ststock, deliberately by prting a trillion dollars a y year of money. and on the other hand we have a drdrop, and this is unprececede, a drop in the recovery. this has been going on -- >> excuse me.
solve that, we will have major advances and a new education and training center. >> and how is the investment focus, do you think, and the strategic focus, going to shift as we look beyond a steady state afghanistan operation? >> i think we will very -- nato was very wise to invest in command and control. command and control is absolutely crucial. and now, we have a new technology. we understand much better how we can interact at a distance. we must, as well, deploy some demand and control elements. and how we can empower, i who say, the strategy corporal in the field, with the new technology. so we have a lot of things. in terms of the country as well. and certainly in the air/land domain, how we work again better together. we improve the efficiency. and the keys are the joint intellnnceg of everything. and afterwards, selective measures, selective effects to reach the best level of efficiency, i would say, on the realm, depending on the effects that we are really expecting from those system, those people, those men and women. >> you just had an industry day. have you been
the people at the lower end of the educational distribution. those people need jobs and deserve jobs. unfortunately for the only way to solve the problem is not simply to legislate higher wages if we could do that you could ask, why don't we legislate wages that are $90 an hour instead of nine are ten or $15 an hour. obviouy we know why we don't do that. that would be impractical, and we would lose jobs at an enormous rate if we did something like that. you can't do that. what you have to do is reform the educational system, make sure that these people have the skills that are necessary to compete in a modern economy. melissa: and do what? and do what? i want to run at a time. reck we channel them? are there enoogh jobs fixing the robots, fixing the automated checkout machines, programming them. is there the same number of jobs doing new things to replace the jobs that are being made obsolete by computers and robots and drowns and everything else? >> absolutely. go back to 2007. the and upon the rate was just over 4%. so all of those people that i talked about wd the move from manufa
education. that is the reality that the me millennial space. and no matter what people want to call obama or his policies if you don't see upward mobility, you can't have it on the watergate the boy or girl you want to build something for your own future if you want a family. that is reality for millennialist. >> politically it is interesting. there's a great cause of concern because obama won this group by massive majority and they thought that because he could relate to them, that they would be able to lock in this generation is a durable democratic voting majority going into the future. because if you could get them young, that is a part of their identity for the rest of their lives. these numbers is crushing these kids dreams. lou: the gap is larger across the entire force. >> one other thing that i think that the millennialist are is stupid and we can characterize this. but i don't think they are, i think they have caught on, and they have seen that there is no future and there is nothing happening and they have begun to realize that they have no part of that deal and they realize th
, the apartheid remains with gaps in poverty and health care and education. we are in the middle of the end of the apartheid story but now it has just changed faces. >> didn't see that coming. using apartheid to describe present day america. in case you noticed i'm not an older black south african, but if i were i would be peeved. but as attention getting stunts go, comparing your cause always works. and part of it is his fault. he's aligned himself with leftist ideas that have done little to raise the votes of his brethren and others who do not embrace such assumptions. jackson shows it is time for a new batch of leaders, rejecting the government bloat that has dragged so many blacks and whites down. our black conservatives and libertarians, and they exist, but you only hear about them when they are mocked by liberals black and white. i used apartheid regarding such leaders but i'm not that dumb. >>> so, bob, you are good friends with jesse jackson. you hung out with him. i remember seeing him with you once. was he wrong to use the word aparthe apartheid. >> well probably in the context th
like lisa or vera or stan educated, experienced, long tenured workers who can only find jobs that pay far less than the jobs they have lost. i think that that is something we really need to think about in terms of the future consequences of this crisis. it will be a huge crisis if the program is not renewed. there is no question that will affect millions upon millions of people, but long-term unemployment has long-term consequen consequences and builds deficits into our future. we need to take those into account as you all craft policy, we as advocates promote policies. this is not just an immediate problem. it's a long-term crisis for our country. >> i would love to hear from you all. are people saying, hey, lisa, vera, we would hire you, but we know you wouldn't stay here for this $8 an hour, so therefore, we aren't going to hire you? >> representative moore, here is how i want to answer that. you can't prove age discrimination, but i lost my job of 14 years two weeks before i turned 50. two black happy birthday balloons were very appropriate this year. on the online job application
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
of economic development, improved education, enabling techniques for developing new energy resources. the challenge is our a mess. the free flow of ideas that test societies not yet ready to respond, or those wild card or network threats such as the nontraditional threats posed by non-nationstates cyber actors. these types of threats continue to test us on a daily basis. i think the world of cyber and everything out there in the generation for the of young people involved in getting an education today, and where you may be, as i look at my career backwards 33 years and look forward to the kinds of things i have experienced, what one can imagine, what i can imagine standing here today, projecting myself maybe 30 years ahead and trying to think of all of the changes i have seen and many of the others in this room that have been around a little bit, the kinds of dynamics we have seen change. in the information world in just the last work -- five or six years, facebook only came onto the scene in 2005. today, over half a billion people are connected via twitter. these are just some of th
much. the education secretary tony called it the picture of stagnation. >> there is a lot of work that needs to be done. >> but to make you feel better these tests aren't that criminal, but the bigger thing to learn is critical thinking. >> higher order thinking. we were just talking about it. >> we were just talking about it. >> it links to reading, comprehension, and hang on to the music, and it links to matthew. >> that's why some advocates say don't freak out about these kinds of tests and comparison because a lot of it based on memorization and the most important is critical thinking. >> thank you. now. >> you've been hearing that detroit has become the largest municipality to file bankruptcy. david, remember us again, how serious are detroit's financial problems? >> it's very serious. it's serious to the point of all the money that the city of detroit takes in to their tax receipts and revenue, $0.40 on the dollar has to go as far as dealing with the debt that detroit has accumulated. if they did nothing that proportion would go up to $0.65 on the dollar. that is money that
not only had an incredibly active career, but some of the u.s. concentrated on higher education and educating himself. he is a man with three graduate degrees, including one from the u.s. naval war college, and i should add that we were proud to present him with an honorary degree here just a couple of years ago. i should not neglect to say, general flynn has been given many awards, including the defense superior service medal with three oakley's clusters, the legion of merit with an of leaf cluster, the brand star, the meritorious service medal and others that are not too numerous to mention. he is a great friend of this school, and we are honored that you could join us and the floor is yours. >> thank you. [applause] >> great. first, before i get into some formal remarks, i hopefully -- everyone got handed out one of these. it is that there are your see your you got it when you walked in. a pamphlet about the defense intelligence agency and other about who we are all we're doing a behalf of national security for this country. it will give you some idea about the direction of o
services to the education to health care to measure due to rising income levels and the rapid expansion of the asian middle class according to the adb station development outlook twenty twelve update released today developing the service sector with people provide services rather than to school which will be the central theme of cases structural change in the coming years. good things in the world. also on the web and made the networks the north. it is. eye what's up. what's not the main studies are. usa today without all of troops as of monday the phone to see it. got a bunch and six litre see what the end of august on and find a list of books on presidential candidates announced. us national security adviser susan rice visit to kabul and has a meeting with the progress and taught at the side of the uncertainty over the future of us troops in the country. rice maker said it doesn't get on preston's best in class to sign a buy back agreement with the united states offered to send the awful on and dance and asked the security at airports. the meeting between home because audiences and w
support the work that social enterprises do, that anchor institutions like hospitals and educational institutions and others can do to create jobs, again, specifically focused on individuals and communities that have the largest challenges this attaching to our economy. so we don't have a date for that yet, but we're going to set it. we're working on it. and so we'll send invitations out to all of you again since you've been with us today, so look for that in the next couple of weeks. thank you again for joining us today. have a happy thanksgiving, and shop small business on saturday. [laughter] [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> today the leader of french opposition party talks about france and the rest of the international community. he'll discuss a range of issues including the eurozone crisis and his country's refusal to sign off on the recent iranian nuclear deal. we'll have live remarks beginning at 6:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the for dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about dos b specifically, and i ki
the temporary frustrations of the affordable care roll out. >> a lot of it is education. they don't understand what it is and are afraid to go through the process. >> for andy peak the partial government shutdown created confusion and fear about the affordable care act. >> i didn't want to punch the bottom and sign up to pay $280-$300, adding it to my meagre month to month income. >> as the dust settles counselling from the music heath alliance allowed him to take a look and sign up. he'll pay around $150 a month. and for a career musician, that could allow him to pursue his passion of performing for the rest of his life. >>> the administration says healthcare.gov is functional for 80% of users. >>> let's get a look at the morning business headlines. european and u.s. banks are expected to be hit with a fine for manipulating key interest rates. reuters says six bangs will be fined more than $2 million. they rigged bench marks determining the cost of lending from mortgages the banks involved. more regulations will be invoked. banks would be banned from doing anything for their own game. the new
who miss their way to school or simply didn't have access to secondary education the way to bounce back from this summer's that that is the job market with the digital springboard to take a look. that and it's tedious. in adults ages eighteen to twenty five come from deprived neighbourhoods aesthetic appearance. they don't have a diploma and has been an employee for quite awhile. herehey are given the chance to learn a new job during the whole year in a teaching tool industry. in a carnal man. i quit school after my junior year in high school. so i did not graduate can i struggled for four years. and then i worked in sales but then i got bored of them so i thought to myself it's time to find something that suits me. on top of it what's more he's young adults are hired by the association in pd about eight hundred and eighty euro zone month. in exchange their asked to design websites for commercial videos for companies. using computers is second nature to them as they were born in the digital era according to their supervisors all that's left to do is to pass on the known how one mor
of research and education. upon investigation published book that i get on debate. india is expected to visit the wedding she is on top of the mall to buy pink thing. i met up with the font for thinking that if the setup is called upon to that spot kick by cute cousin andifty. by that of what you've done overnight see's with local fight to get to see. although i saw this and just as i'm not the knife that is what the conflict ended. he said. and what the fight. but since this pic is me. it was fine in this credential in the indian auto parts sector and that in the process of setting up manufacturing units and that the fox the president the royal borough of kensington and chelsea constituency phallic say. and by the royal which the cultural society the event will celebrate its one hundredth anniversary guess he joined a firm hundred and sixty thousand bees that is the shame is that the will of god meanwhile it. to see the queen is the new reiki to visit at the da's. joseph our cities or so from day to showcase need tons in twenty twelve to celebrate the queen's sixty eight summit friend. a spe
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. . >>> one prominent political so, with chevy's black friday sale, the price you see is the price you pay? yep, best prices of the year. i can't see. honey. [ laughs ] brad. yeah? what are you doing? uh... hi. hi. [ male announcer ] it's the chevy black friday sale. during the chevy black friday sale, get this malibu ls for under $20,000 or this cruze ls for around $17,000. hurry. the best prices of the year end monday, december 2nd. >>> no meet the press" is back with our political roundtable. chuck todd, stephanie rawlings-blake, andrea mitchell. >> welcome, stephanie rawlings-blake, mayor of baltimore, first time on "meet the press." mayor since 2010, serves on the national democratic committee as well. nice to have you here. >> nice to be here. >> the question is how good are things, really, and chu
public. nbc news has chosen not to broadcast the tapes. our chief education correspondent did listen to them today to see if they reveal anything new. good evening. >> good evening. a judge ruled just last week that while these calls could be a searing reminder of the horror on that awful day they could also support the professionalism and bravery of the adults involved. though the seven recordings made public included very little new information about what happened, what struck me is how calm everyone seemed during this ordial, still, when you look at the faces of those innocent people, you understand why the release of the 911 calls is not only so sensitive to those who lost loved ones but also the entire newtown community. we heard from two teachers. both sounded remarkably calm in front of the children. we also heard from a custodian who stayed on the line with police through the ordeal. you could hear gunshots in the background as he spoke. but what did you not hear was chaos or screaming or children's voices. while many parents did not want these tapes to be released, i did spe
an education, who have made a real investment in trying to secure better careers and are stuck with a waitressing or retail job there are a lot of implications with that. they may have student loans they cannot pay off. that increases their probability of defaulting on the loans. they also lower their lifetime earnings potential. the center for american progress did a study on the long term implications of this. and they found that for the 1 million americans who are young and who are unemploymented because of the great recession they probably lost a collective $20 billion in earnings for the next 10 years. >> what about the larger part of the economy? >> if you have young people living with relatives and friends, couch surfing, renting instead of buying a home because they don't have the money to do that or the credit built up to do that or have bad credit, that pushes back the time line where they can buy a home and if they do it at all. it also had a big implication for consumer spend coming is the biggest part of our economy. if people are earning less over their lifetime t
assembly or interests pass. activists who educate farmers have been gaoled or arrested. >> translation: the wealth cronies and those that confiscated the land are part of the the government. their interests are deeply entrenched in the conflict. >> the government want to resolve land grab issues and formed a parliamentary committee to look into the matter. one lawyer says the committee scope is limited and the independence curtailed by referring cases back to the administration. >> translation: there are protests by the farmer. if it's not resolved quickly, it can morph and lead into riots. this is a rural community with 70% of the population relying on farmers. land dispute have not resolved to underline the past to political uniformity. >> an olympic gold medal won by jesse owens in the 1930s broke records at an auction. the sale continues an inspiring legacy that mr owens left behind. >> this is one gold medal with a very colourful history. won by jessie owen at the 1936 berlin olympics. it's been snapped up for 1.5 million, the highest paid for an olympic medal and it's not a symbo
are much more highly educated and well trained. they are dealing with complex software systems and they are costing more because we invest a lot more in them and it costs more to retain them. there are opportunities in the private sector that are greater. part of the thing driving these military personnel costs to some degree is the technological advancement and the fact that we are expecting -- what we are expecting out of them in terms of training and performance is higher than it was 23 years ago. host: earlier you mentioned the cost of military pay. a "new york times" op-ed last month suggested that military pay should be put on the table. host: do you think it is likely that pay would be a target as the pentagon looks to cut costs? guest: i think that pay as a target is an interesting idea. i don't think anyone is going to flat-out reduce military pay. "the new york times" editorial notes this is a politically and emotionally fraught area of the budget to be debating. i cannot imagine an area where people would be saying you are going to be getting less than this year. wha
in the late to mid 40's and went off to be educated and came back into the political scene, the business scene, the community activities in force for the next 40 years they ran this country. six of the presidents of the united states had been in this greatest generation. every corporate leader had been in the war. all of the political people in washington in the states, the governors, almost all of them were of the greatest generation and for 40 years their culture prevailed and they work together irrespective of different political motivations they were able to pull together to make the country a better place. they have fought to preserve predom and believe deeply in it and to me that has moved on so others have taken over the running of the country and we think it is stable but no better than these veterans were able to do it on their own after having brought freedom to the world. >> as someone who put life on the line for our freedom do you feel freedom and liberty is taken for granted by many in today's generation? >> i think the current generation it is taken for granted. the million who
this is highly unusual. >> the director of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america excessive speed may be to blame a train off the rails and data recorder shows the train was going three times faster than it should have been. a monumentel ruling for the motor city, a judge decides if detroit can file for bankruptcy today. resignation rejected, thailand's prime minister refuses to step down as antigovernment protesters storm her office building. and protection from poachers, how the illegal ivory trade is threatening elephants. ♪
. the number of black children who get educate in the integrated schools is something like 10%. you look at the leadership zuma versus mandela. and it doesn't seem as if this were and upward trend. >> that's true and that discrepancy is true. but it's also true that the standard of living of black south africans has risen considerably since 1993, that the number of black south africans with electricity and clean drinking water and in the education system, all of it's gone up. south africa when you look at it from the outside, a glass half empty, glass half empty viewpoint. but i think what's really going to be interesting goi ing forwa is in a sense a kind of custody battle for brand mandela who claims them as their real symbol. and for mandela, symbolism was his stuff in trade. he realized that he was this astonishingly powerful symbol. a and across the world, we all want to claim him. all other countries want to claim mandela he represents our better selves in that sense. but within south africa, the question is he now a national symbol or to what extent the anc keeps him as their symb
of black children who get educated in integrated schools is something like 10%. you know, you look at the leadership, zuma versus mandela, and you look around africa, it doesn't seem as though sun, you know, it doesn't seem this was an upward trend. >> that's true. that discrepancy is true, but it's also true that the standard of living of black south africans has risen. the number of black south africans with clean drinking water and in the education system has gone up. south africa has been a glass half empty glass half full thing that people tend to project upon south africa a lot of the prejudices with which they enter into the situation to begin with. but i think what's really going to be interesting going forward now is in a sense a kind of custody battle for brand mandela. who claims him as their real symbol, and more mandela symbolism was his stuff in trade. he realized he was an astonishingly powerful symbol. in a sense you can see across the world we all want to claim him. all other countries want to claim mandela. he represents our better selves. but within south africa
: the education system, the job system is not treating all americans equally. you see that in the minority numbers. some of the callers have talked about this. anyou're going into environment where you are the orst person of this race gender in that role, how much more difficult is it for you to break in as opposed to a workforce that is more diverse? host: you look at the overall but the number%, approaches numeral seven percent because of the increase in african-american unemployed and teenagers. correct? guest: that is part of the factors. you have much higher unemployment among minorities and younger people. you also look at it based on educational breakdowns. the unemployment rate is considerably higher among those who have not completed high school compared to those who have completed college. work isic morath's available online. thank you for being with us. coming up next, the vice president is back in the u.s. following a weeklong trip that included stops in china, south korea, and japan. we will have david lampton joining us from johns hopkins to discuss the state of relations between the
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
there who's not my kid has a chance at a good education or that guy over there who i'm not related to has a chance at a decent job and a decent retirement, i'm going to be better off. i'm going to be living in a society that is more cohesive and is going to create the kind of future for our kids that were all want. and that more than anything is at the core of the debate that i've been having with the republican party over the last several years. it's not just the details of the affordable care act or, you know, the minimum wage. because as i said yesterday in the speech, if you've got better ideas for achieving the same goal, put them out there. i'm not wedded to one particular way of doing things. but the central argument i have is we do have an obligation to each other. and there's some things we can do together. in fact, the big challenges we have whether it's immigration, climate change, an economy that works for everybody, improving our education system, making college more affordable, competing in the world economy, dealing with questions of war and peace, those are not things that
educated but to a person they are unhappy they will tell you that the war should have said wide. -- has been one but they realize there are weaknesses within their own government and they feel that they were supporting locker that and the support did come. i don't agree i feel the u.s. and already done much more than say a president eisenhower or kennedy ever foresaw. they had recent vietnam was a domino to be held up with neighboring countries might fall to be the communists push eisenhower has that idea and kennedy it agreed to a peace agreement that gave congress is half the country so clearly have the importance to official at the time to the negotiate the deal. so to by way of thinking, a kennedy had ideas to develop the kreme array the heroic forces was fighting the early wars even he by the third term in office started to pull american troops out so it would strike me that kennedy would be seen to try to
a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. is caused by people looking fore traffic parking.y that's remarkable that so much energy is, is wasted. streetline has looked at the problem of parking, which has not been looked at for the last 30, 40 years, we wanted to rethink that whole industry, so we go and put out these sensors in each parking spot and then there's a mesh network that takes this information sends it over the internet so you can go find exactly where those open parking spots are. the collaboration with citi was important for providing us the necessary financing; allow this small start-up to go provide a service to municipalities. citi has been an incredible source of advice, how to engage with municipalities, how to structure deals, and as we think about internationally, citi is there every step of the way. so the end result is you reduce congestion, you reduce pollution and you provide a service to merchants
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
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